Why Publishing Your Work in YSEC?

The Yearbook of Socio-Economic Constitutions (YSEC) offers an original perspective on law by focusing on the fundamental rules governing our economic and social lives (i.e. the socio-economic constitutions) at the local, national, and international levels. 

Our mission is to combine the solidity and rigor of a classical yearbook with the excitement of a respected journal, keeping a rigorous focus on doctrinal legal treatment of issues that socio-economic constitutions are facing in today’s globalized context, while at the same time remaining open to neighbouring disciplines to the extent that these inform the analysis. Each volume contains a carefully curated selection of high-quality writings covering a current theme and its socio-economic constitutional dimensions. Thus, each contribution to a YSEC volume constitutes a unique singular addition to the research topic as well as a vital part of a comprehensive volume in a topical research field. 

Further, the YSEC provides authors with a clear, reliable, and transparent production. We work closely with each of the authors throughout the production phases in order to secure that the production timeline is respected while the highest academic standards are maintained. Our cooperation with Springer gives us the possibility to grant our authors’ contributions the publicity they deserve. As soon as the contributions are finalized, e-publication is available via the Springer website, which means that our authors do not need to wait for the published volume to disseminate their work. 

Once complete, each volume of YSEC is presented and promoted energetically by the Editorial team and Springer. All finalized chapters are made available directly online by Springer and they are also reachable via the YSEC website. The high-quality printed volume is presented at an annual special book launch arranged by us, and broadcast on various traditional and social media channels.

YSEC is listed at the Norwegian Register for Scientific Journals, Series and Publishers.

YSEC Volume IV (2023)

Call

Open Calls

The Yearbook of Socio-Economic Constitutions is pleased to announce that the deadline for submissions for Volume IV (2003) has been extended to 31 October 2022.

The Yearbook consists of three parts, a specific part covering a specific theme for the particular volume, a general part covering the broad theme of the Yearbook, and a book review part devoted to book reviews, conference reports and the like relevant to socio-economic perspectives on constitutional law. We encourage submissions for all parts. 

Call for contributions to Part I
of YSEC Volume IV (2023) (extended)

Law and the Governance of Artificial Intelligence 

Artificial intelligence (AI) has the potential to radically transform our society. It may lead to a massive increase in the capabilities of humankind and allow us to address some of our most intractable challenges. It may also entail profound disruption to structures and processes that have sustained our society over centuries.  

These developments present a unique challenge to the socio-economic constitutional arrangements which govern our world at national, regional and international level. The deployment of increasingly powerful AI systems, able to function with increasing degree of autonomy, has led to concerns over loss of human control of important societal processes, over the disruption of existing economic, social and legal relationships, and over the empowerment of some societal actors at the expense of others, together with the entrenchment of situations of domination or discrimination. It has also made increasingly clear how tremendous the potential benefits that these technologies may bring, are to those who successfully develop and deploy them. 

There is therefore great pressure on governments, international institutions, public authorities, civil society organisations, industry bodies and individual firms to introduce or adapt mechanisms and structures that will avoid the potentially negative outcomes of AI, and achieve the positive ones. These mechanisms and structures, which have been given the umbrella term ‘AI governance’, cover a wide range of approaches, from individual firms introducing ethical principles which they volunteer to abide by, to the European Union proposing to legislate an AI Act, which will prohibit certain types of AI applications and impose binding obligations on AI developers and users. The fast pace of innovation in the development of AI technologies is mirrored by the fast pace of development of the emerging field of AI governance, where traditional legislation by public bodies is complemented with more innovative approaches, such as hybrid and adaptive governance, ethical alignment, governance by design and the creation of regulatory sandboxes. 

There is an urgent need to understand the implications of these developments for our Socio-Economic Constitutions, and to that end, YSEC invites scholars to contribute original submissions on legal aspects of AI governance.  

Contributions will be welcome to engage with law at the national, regional, or international level, as well as comparative perspectives. AI governance will be understood broadly. It is to include both approaches concerned with AI safety, and with avoiding future existential risks to mankind, as well as approaches focused on more immediate problems or benefits. YSEC will welcome both contributions which map out or delineate the field as well as contributions which engage with, evaluate or criticise existing or proposed governance arrangements. Submissions may explore the interaction between AI governance and legal fields such as e.g.: 

  • Data protection law 
  • Competition law 
  • Health and safety law 
  • Consumer law 
  • Labour law 
  • Health law 
  • Education law 
  • Private law 
  • All aspects of procedural law, including civil, criminal and administrative procedural law 

This list is not intended to be exhaustive, and is merely provided to illustrate the breadth of the intended scope of the issue. The key criterion is that the submission makes a contribution to the field of AI governance  

Submissions which adopt an inter- or transdisciplinary approach, and engage with sociology, economics, philosophy or politics are welcome, as are submissions that adopt a more ‘black letter’ legal methodology. The only criterion is that the focus of the paper is on a legal question. 

Call for contributions to Parts II and III
of YSEC Volume IV (2023)

The YSEC also welcomes contributions for its general part (Part II) focused on any relevant current developments in the broader field of the Yearbook’s coverage, which can be summarized as contemporary analysis of the challenges that constitutional frameworks face in balancing fundamental economic and social interests at the local, national, regional, and global level. Prospective contributors may consider that the Yearbook’s mission is to present current research on legal issues of socio-economic constitutional importance without limitations regarding approaches and theoretical perspectives, while establishing a forum for doctrinal legal treatment of the questions that various socio-economic constitutions are faced with in today’s globalized context. 

For Part III we warmly welcome proposals for book reviews. 

Deadline for proposals (for all three parts of YSEC IV): 31 October 2022 (extended). 

Submission of proposals: Proposals of no more than 500 words should be uploaded to the YSEC Submissions Platform. Successful applicants will be notified in October 2022. The deadline to submit the paper is 1 March 2023. The manuscripts will be subjected to double blind peer review and authors will receive the comments from the editors and the reviewers. The deadline for final submission of the contribution is 30 June 2023. Authors will use the template provided by the YSEC and follow the YSEC’s style guide, both of which will be provided upon successful application. 

The full call can be downloaded here.

  • May 2022

    The call for papers is opened and published on the website.

  • 31st October 2022, midnight (extended)

    Deadline for submitting proposals.

  • October and November 2022

    Selection of authors and invitation to submit chapters.

  • 1st March 2023, midnight

    Selected authors submit their chapters. Chapters are sent straight to peer review.

  • 30th April 2023, estimated

    Deadline for submission of peer reviews. The authors receive their peer-reviewed contributions immediately afterwards.

  • 30th June 2023, midnight

    Deadline for final submission of the revised chapters by the authors.

  • July 2023

    Subject to a final style check by the editors, the chapters and other contributions are submitted to Springer.

  • September – December 2023

    Springer publishes the chapters and other contributions online as soon as they are ready.

  • December 2023

    The full YSEC volume is published in hardcopy before the end of the year.

Submission and Production Timeline YSEC vol IV (2023)

YSEC Volume III (2022)

Call

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS [CLOSED]

The Yearbook of Socio-Economic Constitutions is pleased to announce a call for submissions for the third volume of the Yearbook (2022).

The Yearbook consists of three parts, a specific part covering a specific theme for the particular volume, a general part covering the broad theme of the Yearbook, and a book review part devoted to book reviews, conference reports and the like relevant to socio-economic perspectives on constitutional law. We encourage submissions for all parts.

Call for contributions to Part I of YSEC 2022 (Vol III)

Funding of justice: Access to effective justice in times of marketisation of justice and shrinking public budgets

Funding of justice has significant consequences for the enforcement of rights and impacts directly on access to justice and the right to a fair trial as constitutional rights. For example, if a potential litigant does not have the financial means to bring or defend a claim in court, because the litigant is not eligible for legal aid or cannot use private forms of litigation funding, that litigant is deprived of access to justice. Access to justice in turn essentially impacts on the effective enjoyment of any other constitutional right, since having the actual means to access a court in case of a potential breach strengthens that right.

As public funding is in decline and as market liberalization in the field of justice increases, crucial questions related to the rule of law, access to justice and social and economic development, in the intersection between states, citizens and business are raised. For example, potential questions of conflict of interest and how to ensure independence of the adjudicator, or how to ensure a basic level of equality of access to funding for weaker parties such as consumers, whilst at the same time protecting market freedom and the right to business.

Furthermore, the funding of justice is not an exclusively domestic issue but has increasing importance also for the supranational and international level of markets, actors and regulators. At the EU level this has been evidenced recently by the rules on third-party litigation funding in Directive 2020/1828/EU on representative actions for the protection of the collective interests and the broader study of the European Parliament “Responsible private funding of litigation: European added value assessment” published in 2021.

Funding of justice - the specific theme for this volume - concerns the socio-economic constitutional challenges associated with three broad perspectives on funding: “venue funding”, “party funding” and “law funding”. Funding of the venues of justice concerns funding of a multitude of bodies such as court systems, alternative dispute resolution bodies, or international dispute resolution fora. Funding of the parties to a dispute relates to both legal aid and other public schemes as well as funding products available on private markets, such as litigation insurance, third-party litigation finance and crowd-funding, as well as different forms of assigning or selling claims. Funding of law revolves around intellectual property, availability, and accessibility of laws, court decisions, legal sources, and other law-related data.

Public funding of venues and parties has come under pressure due to the reality of financial austerity measures and the tightening public budgets in many countries across the globe. This has contributed to privatization and marketisation of funding for venues and parties in ever more jurisdictions. Funding of law-related data has also evolved in the private sector entailing that access to such data for the public and even public institutions is now in some jurisdictions in the control of private actors. This redistribution of funding from public to private actors can be beneficial if it increases access but it also elicits new perspectives on constitutional rights; both traditional rights such as access to justice and more nascent rights such as access to legal data.

The YSEC invites scholars to address in original contributions the socio-economic constitutional mechanisms relevant to the funding of justice, in different parts of the world, and to contribute new and critical perspectives. Questions to explore, in a domestic, regional or global context, could be how recent developments in the funding of justice have affected access to justice or access to the legal data; what effectiveness and efficiency gains and losses can be noted and what risks can be identified to constitutionally protected rights? What effects, if any, do marketisation and liberalization have on the fairness of proceedings and on the accountability of justice systems and how should constitutional rights be appropriately protected in this context?

Call for contributions to Parts II and III of YSEC 2022 (Vol III)

The YSEC also welcomes contributions for its general part focused on any relevant current developments in the broader field of the Yearbook’s coverage. Prospective contributors should consider that the Yearbook aims to provide a forum for doctrinal legal treatment of the questions that various socio-economic constitutions are faced with in today’s globalized context, and for contemporary analysis of the challenges that constitutional frameworks face in balancing fundamental economic and social interests at the local, national, regional, and global level. Finally, we also welcome proposals for the book review part.

Deadline for proposals: 30 September 2021.

Submission of proposals: Proposals of no more than 500 words should be uploaded to the YSEC Submissions Platform. Successful applicants will be notified in October 2021. The deadline to submit the paper is 1 March 2022. The manuscripts will be subjected to double blind peer review and authors will receive the comments from the editors and the reviewers. The deadline for final submission of the contribution is 30 June 2022. Authors will use the template provided by the YSEC and follow the YSEC’s style guide, both of which will be provided upon successful application.

The full Call can be downloaded here.

  • June 2021

    The call for papers is opened and published on the website.

  • 30th September 2021, midnight

    Deadline for submitting proposals.

  • October 2021

    Selection of authors and invitation to submit chapters.

  • 1st March 2022, midnight

    Selected authors submit their chapters. Chapters are sent straight to peer review.

  • 30th April 2022, latest

    Deadline for submission of peer reviews. The authors receive their peer-reviewed contributions immediately afterwards.

  • 30th June 2022, midnight

    Deadline for final submission of the revised chapters by the authors.

  • July 2022

    Subject to a final style check by the editors, the chapters and other contributions are submitted to Springer.

  • September – December 2022

    Springer publishes the chapters and other contributions online as soon as they are ready.

  • December 2022

    The full YSEC volume is published in hardcopy before the end of the year.

Submission and Production Timeline YSEC vol III (2022)